The Clog and Billycock – Pleasington, Blackburn

“These RVI (Ribble Valley Inns) pubs are still doing it well, though others are cathcing up”

Been to a few of these, there are four in total. The Three Fishes in Mitton was our first. They all boast high standards of produce from local artisans. Images of Jeff and his bangers, Mavis and her sourdough and others adorn the walls  to emphasise the deal. The Clog and Billycock in sleepy Pleasington, a rural village on the outskirts of Blackburn, maintains the tradition.
IMG_2345
Another feature of them all is the smart decor and impressive fit out materials. No nailed on OSB and cheap ply in the Ribble Valley Inn group. Veneered, light oaks and high end fabrics create a sumptuous feel.
fullsizeoutput_29b4
The menus and food are great too. Its extensive Lancashire based fayre. Nigel Howarth’s hot pot, fish and chips, black puddings, scotch eggs, they’re all here. As it happens we chose from the rather inviting separately printed, spring menu.
IMG_2346
The Flame had wonderfully spiced chicken livers on sourdough, my slightly disappointing start was a rather dry fish cake, with an equally dry egg, which was, however, just saved by the swamp of creamy leeks that it sat on.

Mains were a triumph. Super fish pie whilst I had the best moules frites since an alfresco lunch in Lille in 1990!
IMG_2347
I finished with the delightful white chocolate and lemon curd posset which came festooned with spring fruits.
IMG_2348
Since we went a few weeks back the press later announced that the Northcote/Nigel Haworth alliance was selling the four RVI emporiums. I hope they go to a good home and maintain the standard. They are a rare treat.

The Clog & Billycock
Billinge End Rd,
Pleasington
Blackburn
BB2 6QB
T 01254 201163

http://www.theclogandbillycock.com

Advertisements

Trains and Food – The Cumbrian Hoovers – Pathfinder Tours

“Not your normal restaurant, service a bit wobbly, especially by the sea!”

What could be better? A journey across some of England’s finest railway scenery on board a luxurious carriage, pulled by a brace of English Electric’s finest. The tour was called ‘The Cumbrian Hoovers’, a nod to the nick name given to these fine old machines by trainspotters of yore. Tremendous stuff.

IMG_4449
Photo by Liam Barnes

A gentlemen’s day to Carlisle and back via Settle and the breathtaking Cumbrian coast started on a bracing morn in Warrington. Within minutes a traditional breakfast of muesli, yoghurt and a fine, full english fry up was on the plate, deftly, sprung by ‘The Frying Scotsman’. Lashings of hot coffee served in the finest bone china completed the set.

IMG_2301

The trip organised by Pathfinder Tours started in Birmingham with a few pick ups along the way. The chief attraction, for rail enthusiasts was the fact that the train was lugged around behind a pair of preserved, Class 50, diesel locomotives, which just by chance were originally manufactured some fifty years earlier, at the Vulcan Foundry in my home town of Newton-le-Willows. As a fifty something myself, heritage diesel locomotives represent the similar whiff of nostalgia that my father would find with steam locomotives.

IMG_2304

The train soon veered off the beaten track and the ascent to Settle and the famous Ribblehead Viaduct was underway. A stop at the wonderfully preserved, Hellifield station providing a welcome leg stretch. The hordes disembarked and flooded the platforms with high tech, digital imagery equipment. The locos were seemingly highly photogenic in some of their former liveries. Indeed the surrounding countryside was littered with folk eager to see and video proceedings.

IMG_2344

Lunchtime saw us arrive in Carlisle. Some early scouting had daned that  The Kings Head in the centre to be a venue capable of providing suitable sustenance. A couple of Windermere pale ales quenched our thirst. For the record I hereby vouch that Carlisle has the largest block paved patio in the world. The whole town centre is covered in it!

Back on the train we set out on a different loop to venture down the stunning west Cumbrian coast. Whitehaven, Maryport, Ravenglass, Foxfield all glided past, whilst the sun covered sea stretched out to the horizon.

fullsizeoutput_239d

By this time, our genial hosts were serving up our 5 course gourmet meal. Confit duck leg with roasted vegetable cous cous salad, to start. Baked gammon, pineapple, Cumberland sauce with new potatoes, fried courgettes and red cabbage with a ginger and garlic sauce. It was all rather wonderful. We finished with a bramley apple and damson pie with custard followed by a fine cheeseboard and coffee. A couple of nice bots of merlot and the odd ‘Spitfire’ helped it all down.

IMG_2302

After another photo stop in Barrow, amidst bemused onlookers, we were soon barreling through Grange Over Sands and over the famous Kent bridge at Arnside, (see image at the top of the page by Darren JB).

Soon we were back on the straight and narrow west coast main line and my arrival in Warrington beckoned. My chum Craig and I had pretty much spent eleven hours venturing around the hidden lines of Lancashire and Cumbria. A fantastic day had by all.

IMG_2303

If this is something you would in interested in doing, the premier class trip that we did costs around £259 each, though a standard class seat without the food costs around £75. For details of any further trips around the country please visit the website below. I’ll certainly be on the lookout for more.

http://www.Pathfindertours.co.uk
01453 835414 or 834477